Sujit Choudhry On Ways to Safeguard Democracy

Sujit Choudhry is a professor at the UC Berkley School of Law who has extensive knowledge of constitutional law and constitution building. He has written more than 90 articles, book chapters and reports on constitutional issues on a national and international level (works.bepress.com).

In a recent chapter, Sujit Choudhry discussed a statement made by Eric Holder, Attorney General under former President Obama. Holder asserted on Twitter that if Robert Mueller should be fired or his investigative department compromised, it would be important for the American people to speak out forcefully and peacefully to defend the investigation and demand that it be allowed to proceed to completion.

A Threaten Integrity

According to Choudhry, when the integrity of a country’s constitution is threatened by internal forces, it is the responsibility of the people to stand up publicly and speak out fearlessly to hold the guilty parties accountable and demand restitution.

Sujit Choudhry describes other circumstances that could constitute a constitutional crisis. In the USA and other countries, a president can only serve two terms in office. Choudhry said an authoritarian leader might try to violate this term limit by declaring a state of emergency, disbanding the legislature, or suspending elections.

This abuse of power to stay in office is described by Sujit Choudhry as a ‘self-coup’ or autogolpe. Related to the above would be a ‘coup d’etat’ or military overthrow of the government. Lastly, a constitutional crisis is formed when electoral fraud is used to stay in office, giving unconstitutional seizure of power the look of legality.

Sujit Choudhry explains that democracy is made of many small parts. We might think of it as a puzzle put together a single piece at a time. Like a puzzle, it can also be taken apart piece by piece. If a democracy is destroyed, it will not be with one sudden blow, but with many small hammers chipping away at the foundations.

The final admonition given by Choudhry is that courts must be willing to call autocracy by name. There can be no democracy unless the people’s voices are heard. By calling out authoritarians and opposing autocracy, justice can be upheld and the American people can be both seen and heard.

Connect with Sujit, visit Facebook.

Related link:  http://sujitchoudhry.com/about/

Sujit Choudhry Contributing on Democracy as we Know It

Sujit Choudhry is an active part of constitutional and comparative constitutional law. He is an educator, author, and an expert in the fields, as well as the founder and Director of the Center for Constitutional Transitions (constitutionaltransitions.org). Sujit Choudhry has been active for more than 20 years, staring his work in Law in 1996.

He has studied at several academic institutions such as the McGill University, Harvard Law School, the University of Toronto, and the University of Oxford. Sujit Choudhry explains that having studied at a few countries and navigating the legal landscape in the process has allowed him to become involved in the legal system outside of his academic studies as well. Those have also been quite varied as Sujit Choudhry would cross-reference several fields in Law and aggregated knowledge from all of them.

More about Choudhry on http://sujitchoudhry.com/about

Sujit Choudhry was astounded to observe the incomplete information that was available in his primary field of studies which was comparative constitutional law. He noticed that the answers to some of the most asked and most important questions were too vague often incomplete or even missing. That made Sujit Choudhry want to find out more and help fill in those gas through his career in the field. He started accomplishing that with the establishment of his center for Constitutional Transitions.

Recently, Sujit Choudhry discussed the political climate in the western world. More specifically, Sujit Choudhry addressed the democracy as we know it today. He most recently completed a chapter in a new book called Constitutional Democracies in Crisis?

In his section, Sujit Choudhry analyzed and discussed a specific statement directed out in the December of last year. Robert Mueller made it on Twitter. Sujit Choudhry concluded in the chapter that the statement directs responsibility of officials away from them under patriotic pretenses. Sujit Choudhry explains that the state was established on constitutional self-enforcement, as he put it, and changes around the focal point.

Sujit Choudhry often provides commentary on statements made by officials. He also assists countries such as Sri Lanka, Egypt, and more with constitutional debacles and transition. Most recently, Sujit Choudhry worked with Ukraine to help solve some of the issues the country has been having.

Connect with Choudhry on visit LinkedIn

Sujit Choudhry Is A Constitutional Expert Who Is Educating The World Through His Writing

Sujit Choudhry is a professor and worldwide scholar who focuses on comparative constitutional politics and law. He has written quite a bit on constitutional law in Canada and specializes in helping countries in conflict transition from chaos into an ordered society that follows a constitution (constitutionaltransitions.org).

Recently, Choudhry penned a chapter in a book where he hones in on a tweet sent out by former Attorney General, Eric Holder, stating that there should be peaceful demonstrations if Robert Mueller, Special Counsel to the White House, was terminated. In the chapter, Choudhry found it interesting that Holder didn’t mention that there should be legal challenges made if Mueller was terminated, but that, instead, he turned it over to the people to take care of.

Sujit Choudhry has also pointed out the importance of presidential term limits and that an autocrat would be the first one to want to do away with this kind of rule. He elaborated that they may do this by declaring some sort of state of emergency or putting off elections until a later date. Choudhry explains further that events like this are what people call “red lines,” and that red lines are indicators of failure in a democratic system. He feels that there is a growing threat to constitutional democracy and that it has been gaining momentum since the cold war. In the same book chapter referred to before, he wrote more about how the democracy in Poland is being threatened, and specifically, how new rules were made that are there to keep a single party in power (works.bepress.com)

Sujit Choudhry has also pointed out other threats to constitutional democracy including times where elected leaders manipulate rules and institutions to stay in office or in power far longer than they should. He used Weimar Germany as an example and pointed out that the country was taken over from within. He also illustrated the point that there is no light distinction between democracies and autocracies, because they are like night and day. Sujit Choudhry plans on continuing to shine the light on the issues and positives when dealing with democracies and countries that are putting together their own constitutions.

Keep up with Choudhry at https://twitter.com/sujit_choudhry